Moorside High School

Moorside High School

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SEN Information Report

Moorside High School SEN Information Report

The SEN Reforms place a statutory requirement on schools from 1 September 2014 to make information available to young people and parents about how the school supports children and young people with SEN. This information will form the main basis for the school’s SEN Information Report, which has to be published on the school’s website.  The name and contact details of the SENCO at Moorside High School and a link to the Local Authority’s Local Offer will be displayed on the website.

You will find the local offer from Salford Local Authority here:   http://www.salford.gov.uk/localoffer.htm

Click here to view the SEN Code of Practice.

School/Academy Name

Moorside High School

Name and contact details of your school’s SENCO

Sharon Peatfield
0161 921 1045
sharon.peatfield@moorsidehigh.com

We want to ensure that we keep your information up-to-date.   To help us to do this, please provide the name and contact details of the person/role responsible for maintaining details of the Local Offer for your school/academy

Name of Person/Job Title

Sharon Peatfield- SENCO, Assistant Head Teacher

Contact telephone number

0161 921 1045

Email

sharon.peatfield@moorsidehigh.com

I confirm that our Local Offer has now been published on the school/academy website.

Please give the URL for the direct link to your school’s Local Offer

 http://www.moorsidehigh.co.uk/Local-Offer/

Name

 Sharon Peatfield

Date

 11th October 2015

Please find below information provided to ensure that the children and young people with Special Educational Needs (SEN) or disabilities and their parents/carers know what support they can expect at Moorside High School.

Teaching & Learning 

Local Offer: Guidance for High Schools/Academies

Teaching and Learning

  1. What additional support can be provided in the classroom?
  2. What provision do you offer to facilitate access to the curriculum and to develop independent learning? (This may include support from external agencies and equipment/facilities)
  3. Staff specialisms/expertise around SEN or disability
  4. What ongoing support and development is in place for staff regards supporting children and young people with SEN?
  5. What arrangements are made for reasonable adjustments in the curriculum and support to the pupil during exams?
  6. How do you share educational progress and outcomes with parents?
  7. What external teaching and learning do you offer?
  8. What arrangements are in place to ensure that support is maintained in "off site provision"?
  9. What work experience opportunities do you offer?

Teaching and Learning

1. What additional support can be provided in the classroom?

 

  • Quality First Teaching
  • Learning Support Assistants directed and targeted support in all subject areas
  • Small class sizes allowing for more differentiated groups
  • A range of differentiated resources to remove barriers to learning and support subject based skills and learning.
  • Personalised teaching to pupils’ specific needs through the use of personalised one page ‘Pupil Passports’ for pupils with SEN/D which provide teachers with information regarding strengths, difficulties and strategies.
  •  Subject specific vocabulary lists and staff trained in phonic acquisition via ‘Sound’ training.
  • Access to personal laptops
  • Access to up-to-date IT and software on an Interactive Whiteboard
  • Frequent classroom observations of Learning Support Assistants from the SENCO/Assistant SENCO
  •  Observation of a pupil with S’END within the classroom, and expert advise and strategies provided by the SENCO/Assistant SENCO
  • Cross curricular collaboration and joint teacher planning
  • Documentation which enables efficient communication between teachers and Learning Support Assistants- Learning Support Assistant Liaison sheet
  •  Effective support and training for teachers regarding SEN issues through scheduled termly staff SEN Link meetings  

2. What provision do you offer to facilitate access to the curriculum and to develop independent learning? (This may include support from external agencies and equipment/facilities)

Collaboration with the school’s Educational Psychologist which includes actions such as:

  • Training for school staff, direct work undertaken with individual pupils with SEND, observations and attendance at meetings
  • Commissioning of other relevant professional expertise such as School Improvement Officer
  • Access to the Learning Support Service involving training for school staff, the production of personalised resources, strategies implemented and reviewed in collaboration and attendance of meetings
  • Access to Speech and Language Therapist, Occupational Therapist- to provide curriculum support advice, direct work and training
  • One to one sessions with key workers to pre-teach and use of strategies such as social stories
  • Small group sessions with year group learning mentors which allow time for pupils with SEN/D to learn in a suitable environment, with differentiated resources  within a nurturing session
  • 1-1 sessions with Learning Mentors and LSA’s where support is targeted to promote independent learning and life skills,
  • Laptops and I pads
  • Coloured overlays/coloured exercise books for pupils with dyslexic tendencies
  • Online programmes to test pupils for Dyslexia and Dyscalculia
  • ELKLAN  trained Learning Support Assistants

3. Staff specialisms/expertise around SEN or disability

 

  • Full time SENCO – Assistant Head Teacher and Assistant SENCO- also responsible for pupils with English as An Additional Language and Looked After Children
  • 2 LSAs trained in ELKLAN
  •  LSA trained in catch up literacy
  • LSA’s experienced working with Autism Spectrum Condition pupils
  • LSA’s who are able to offer additional emotional support to pupils who may have attachment issues.
  • Specialist Resource Unit with staff experienced in working with pupils with Social, Emotional and Mental Health Difficulties
  • All staff recognise their role as teachers and practitioners of learners with SEN and plan for individual needs.

4. What ongoing support and development is in place for staff regards supporting children and young people with SEN?

 

  • An extensive programme of in house and external trainers timetables on the school’s calendar for whole school staff. Staff development is ongoing and identified through staff appraisals.
  • Close liaison with specialist SEN schools within Salford
  • Network of support within the Salford Authority via attendance of termly meetings with other SENCOs
  • Attendance of authority led training regarding pupils with SEN
  • Attendance of external courses designed to support specialist teachers of SEN, such as NASEN
  • A line management system where all staff are provided with effective support from the SEN Faculty
  • Induction meetings for new staff, cover staff and NQTs
  • Regular SEN Link meetings delivered by the SEN Faculty and External professionals to faculty staff representatives
  • Attendance of the SEN Panel at the Local Authority SEN office by Assistant SENCO

5. What arrangements are made for reasonable adjustments in the curriculum and support to the pupil during exams?

 

  • Efficient lines of communication between the SENCO/Assistant SENCO and the school’s Exams Officer to ensure that access arrangements are in place to ‘remove any disadvantage or barrier’ to equality of access. This includes; readers, scribes, use of laptops, extra time, test breaks smaller room for anxious students and practical help for pupils with a physical disability.
  •  Efficient liaison with the School Educational Psychologist or Consultant Educational Psychologist to prepare for assessments required for Access Arrangements
  • Ongoing training for readers and scribes before exam period.
  • Ensuring that these arrangements are able to be used in the classroom as a usual way of working as far as staff availability will allow
  • Teachers informed of all pupils having SEND via the School SEND register
  • Teachers have access to individual one page pupil profiles and use subject specific targets based on information provided to support pupils prior to exam.
  • Ensuring that all staff are aware of their statutory obligations as far as reasonable adjustments are concerned (through in service training and dissemination of information)

6. How do you share educational progress and outcomes with parents?

 

  • Annual Parents Evenings
  • Progress Reports sent home termly charting pupil’s academic levels, effort and behaviour in each subject
  • Staff available to meet with parents as and when required or where appropriate
  • Statutory Annual Review meetings for pupils with more complex SEN
  • Termly Review of pupil passports and setting of SMART targets
  • Open lines of communication through telephone conversations/e mails
  • Faculty/subject specific post cards home
  • The use of a pupil planner to be signed weekly by parents/carers ensuring effective communication between home and school

7. What external teaching and learning do you offer?

 

  • City West Housing Trust work experience – KS4 pupils – 1 day release per week
  • Nisai Learning Programme
  • Fire Fly Programme
  • Teens and Toddlers Group
  • Fairbridge
  • Springwood Cohort
  • Learning Support Services Teaching Team and Support Assistants
  • EMTAS Teachers and Support Assistants
  • Speech and Language Therapists
  • MAPAS and peripatetic music teachers
  • Randstad Tuition service used as and where appropriate for selected pupils with SEN
  • Various school trips and visits related to the curriculum and additional learning experiences.

8. What arrangements are in place to ensure that support is maintained in "off site provision"?

 

  • Attendance is checked by the provider and school is notified if pupils do not attend.
  • Regular contact with external providers to ensure behaviour is of a high standard at all times.
  • All personnel have to have a DBS documentation
  • Risk assessment in place
  • If support is needed for literacy, numeracy or to meet the needs of pupils with SEN, school will provide support.

9. What work experience opportunities do you offer?

  • A small group of KS4 pupils have experienced work experience with City West Housing Trust one day per week. Pupils participate in construction work and develop life skills
  • This is subject to meeting strict criteria

Annual Reviews

1.      What arrangements are in place for review meetings for children with Statements or Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plans?

2.      What arrangements are in place for children with other SEN support needs?

Annual Reviews

1.      What arrangements are in place for review meetings for children with Statements or Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plans?

 

  • Invites to all parties involved.
  • Arrangements for parents/carers to attend review meetings at times convenient to them.
  • Consultation with teaching staff prior to any meetings.
  • Parents are consulted and invited to give their comments and views.
  • Pupils are consulted and invited to give their comments and views
  • All external agencies are invited to Annual Review meeting to update and present their views. If agencies are unable to attend a report is requested and shared.
  • A formal meeting is arranged once/year but a number of informal review meetings may be undertaken throughout the year as required.
  • An LSA who is key worker for the individual pupil provides the main input and co-ordination for School report
  • The SENCO/Assistant SENCO chairs the review meeting and is responsible for compiling the final report to the Local Authority.
  • The Local Authority is invited if necessary and at parental request

2.      What arrangements are in place for children with other SEN support needs

  • SENCO/Assistant SENCO support
  • Use of one page pupil passports reviewed termly by keyworkers, parents, and pupil
  • Pupils identified through a whole school SEN/D List which informs teachers of the type of need and severity of difficulty that an individual pupil may have
  • Frequent classroom observation of SEN/D pupils within the classroom
  • Concerns from subject staff are shared via SEN faculty link with the SENCo/Assistant SENCo
  • “Catch up Literacy” for pupils with low reading age
  • Advice sought from external professionals for assessments and strategies
  • LSA´s can work on a “one to one” basis or in small group situations
  • Smaller class sizes for lower ability groups
  • Open lines of communication with home
  • Pre visits to colleges
  • Liaison with other relevant professionals such as Connexions, Youth Services

Keeping Children Safe

  1. What handover arrangements will be made at the start and end of the school day?  Do you have parking areas for pick up and drop offs?
  2. What support is offered during breaks and lunchtimes?
  3. How do you ensure my son/daughter stays safe outside the classroom? (e.g. during PE lessons and school trips)
  4. What are the school arrangements for undertaking risk assessments?
  5. Where can parents find details of policies on bullying?

Keeping Children Safe

  1. What handover arrangements will be made at the start and end of the school day?  Do you have parking areas for pick up and drop offs?

 

  • Pupils with SEN can access the Learning Centre before form and speak to a member of the SEB department.
  • The SEN staff are available to speak to parents/carers at the start of the school day if required,
  • At the start of each day pupils will report to their form tutor
  • Efficient line of communication with SENCO and all form tutors
  • Separate entrance and exit available for pupils attending the Resource Unit
  • Taxi drop off area identified in the Visitor Car Park from Deans Rd
  • Parking facilities are available for the disabled

2. What support is offered during breaks and lunchtimes?

  • Staffed Learning Support area (MLC) this is open before school, during break/lunch times. Timetabled supervised events at lunchtime.
  • A lunch time group which allows vulnerable pupils to take their lunch as a group and slightly earlier than the rest of the school.
  • Identified vulnerable pupils are issued with lunchtime passes to allow early access to the dining hall without queuing reducing behavioural incidents.
  • Pupils with the lunchtime pass are able to use small outside play area which is supervised by staff.
  • Pupils who have mobility difficulties which prevent them from going outside are able to stay with their peers within a supervised area of the school.
  • Faculty specific clubs at lunch times
  • School staff on duty in designated areas
  • The school library is open during lunch times and after school

3. How do you ensure my son/daughter stays safe outside the classroom? (e.g. during PE lessons and school trips)

 

  • Teachers meet and greet at the start of the lesson and dismiss at the end of the lesson therefore staff are around at changeover periods.
  • Annual Safeguarding training provided by all school staff
  • PE lessons are always supervised and risk assessments for individual pupils are undertaken if and when necessary.
  • Pupils will be supported in the changing rooms by staff if deemed appropriate
  • Risk assessments are completed for all school trips and, if necessary, individual risk assessments for pupils in conjunction with the parents.
  • Effective whole school behaviour policy in place and enforced by all staff
  • Prior to pupil acceptance on school visits, pupil names are cross referenced with Directors of Learning or designated Safeguarding Officer to ensure appropriate plans are put in place for individual pupils

4. What are the school arrangements for undertaking risk assessments?  

 

  • Risk Assessments for School visits are produced at the start of the academic year and are in line with Salford LA by completing evidence based information on the LA’s EVOLVE form.
  • Risk Assessments are reviewed annually and amended when circumstances change
  • Pre visits assessments are carried out wherever appropriate and arrangements for SEN pupils are carefully planned and monitored.
  • Pupils with a statement of SEN have their needs met on all school visits and residential trips
  • Pupil specific risk assessments are in place where appropriate, and shared with school staff where appropriate

5. Where can parents find details of policies on bullying?

  • The anti bullying policy can be found on the school website
  • Parents can request a hard copy if they contact school reception. Policies may be e mailed or a hard copy provided.
  • A list of related policies can be found on the School Web Site.  

Health (including Emotional Health and Wellbeing)

1. What is the school’s policy on administering medication?

2. How do you work with the family to draw up a care plan and ensure that all relevant staff are aware of the plan?

3. What would the school do in the case of a medical emergency

4. How do you ensure that staff are trained/qualified to deal with a child’s particular needs?

5. Which health or therapy services can children access on school premises?

Health (including Emotional Health and Wellbeing

  1. What is the school’s policy on administering medication?
  • School has a First Aid Policy which includes guidance on medication administration. The policy has been authorised by the School Governing Body.
  • Identified members of staff within school who are responsible for medical issues and first aid.

2. How do you work with the family to draw up a care plan and ensure that all relevant staff are aware of the plan?

 

  • A meeting is held with the parents/carers and the person in charge of first aid.
  • All professionals supporting the pupil are invited to input into the care plan
  • The Care Plan is shared with all staff via a weekly briefing and this is available on the within the pupil profile folders/SEN faculty/staff computer network.
  • The care plan is monitored by the First Aid Manager on a regular basis and adjustments are made as and when needed. The SENCo is consulted if required.

3. What would the school do in the case of a medical emergency

 

  • Contact a qualified first aider.
  • Call 999 if required
  •  Contact parent/carer
  • In the absence of a parent/carer a first aider will accompany a pupil to hospital until a parent/carer arrives

4. How do you ensure that staff are trained/qualified to deal with a child’s particular needs?

 

  • Designated safeguarding staff undertake safeguarding/child protection training which is updated every two years.
  • Safeguarding/child protection training is ongoing for relevant staff through LA training and external courses
  • All staff are fully briefed of the procedures on safeguarding/child protection on an annual basis.
  • Asthma training is provided in school to relevant staff.
  • Relevant staff are trained on how to use an Epi pen.
  • Relevant staff are trained on CAF completion and other documents.
  • Identified staff are trained by relevant professionals in terms of Team Teach and safe handling
  • Training by external professionals for ASD, ADHD, EAL
  • Individual pupil forums are delivered to staff working closely with pupils with specific needs
  • Regular physiotherapy /occupational therapy advice for individual pupils. Key worker will liaise.
  • Identified staff have been trained in specialist areas of SEN for pupils with more complex SEN/D
  • SENCO/Assistant SENCO undertaking National Award for Special Educational Needs Co-ordination

5. Which health or therapy services can children access on school premises?

 

  • School Nurse “drop in” Monday lunchtimes. 
  • Appointments can be arranged for children to see the School Nurse outside drop in times
  • For more specialist requirements children can access key workers from Social Services, Educational Psychologist, Physiotherapist, speech therapist, Occupational Therapist, or the Youth Offending Team. This is not exhaustive and may be added to within the academic year to meet pupil needs.

Communication with Parents

  1. How do you ensure that parents know “who’s who” and who they can contact if they have concerns about their child/young person?
  2. Do parents have to make an appointment to meet with staff or do you have an Open Door policy?
  3. How do you keep parents updated with their child/young person’s progress?
  4. Do you offer Open Days?
  5. How can parents give feedback to the school?  

Communication with Parents

  1. How do you ensure that parents know “who’s who” and who they can contact if they have concerns about their child/young person?

 

  • Information is available on the School Web Site
  • Information is shared to within school admission package for all new pupils and parents/carers are informed of staff changed.
  • Information is distributed at Parents Evenings.
  • Assemblies are delivered to all year groups identifying key members of staff with regards to keeping safe and healthy.
  • Open lines of communication between school and home via telephone, email and pupil planners.
  • The SENCo provides a mobile text service which parents can text with any concerns regarding their child. A reply will be given immediately if required or by the end of the school day.

2. Do parents have to make an appointment to meet with staff or do you have an Open Door policy?

  • Whilst there is an Open Door policy due to teaching commitments, it is not always possible to speak to the member of staff immediately. 
  • An available person will always speak to the concerned individual and an appointment can be made at a mutually convenient time
  • All parental telephone requests will be replied to within 24 hours. Urgent/emergency requests will be responded to immediately.

3. How do you keep parents updated with their child/young person’s progress?

4. Do you offer Open Days?

 

  • Parents Evenings
  • Progress checks sent home termly
  • Telephone calls/e mails
  • Scene setting evenings for Year 7 and GCSE pupils
  • Annual review meetings for SEND pupils
  • Keyworkers are in regular contact with parent/carers by e mail/telephone
  • Open Days take place in September/October
  • Parents/carers can make an appointment to tour the school
  • School reporting system for any pupils requiring additional support for behaviour or organisation which is signed on a daily basis
  • The use of a pupil planner signed by home and school on a weekly basis
  • School utilises social media ‘Twitter’ to promote and celebrate pupil success

5. How can parents give feedback to the school

  • Evaluations given out after Parents Evenings
  • By e mail/telephone
  • During meetings
  • Meet individual staff by arrangement
  • Through pupil and parent/carer surveys

Working Together

  1. Do you have home/school contracts?
  2. What opportunities do you offer for pupils to have their say? e.g. school council
  3. What opportunities are there for parents to have their say about their son/daughter’s education?
  4. What opportunities are there for parents to get involved in the school or become school governors?
  5. How does the Governing Body involve other agencies in meeting the needs of pupils with SEN and supporting their families? (e.g. health, social care, voluntary groups)

Working Together

  1. Do you have home/school contracts?

 

  • Home/school contracts are issued when a child is admitted to the school. They are signed by parents and kept on file.
  • Parents sign consent slips via school planners at the start of each academic year

2. What opportunities do you offer for pupils to have their say? e.g. school council

 

  • Pupil voice
  • School council
  • Listening to pupils on an informal basis
  • Pupils voice forms part of developmental learning walks and when new staff are interviewed
  • School prefect system
  • Peer Mentoring System
  • Peer Mediating System
  • Pupil written responses to staff feedback

3. What opportunities are there for parents to have their say about their son/daughter’s education?

 

  • Parents Evenings
  • Review meetings
  • Meetings with individual teachers
  • Telephone/e mails
  • Parental questionnaires/surveys

4. What opportunities are there for parents to get involved in the school or become school governors?

 

  • Invitation to become a School Governor is given at new pupils´
  • parents evenings and when a vacancy becomes available
  • via the Web site
  • Encouraged to be involved with any charity events
  • Encouraged to support events e.g. drama productions, sports day etc.

5. How does the Governing Body involve other agencies in meeting the needs of pupils with SEN and supporting their families? (e.g. health, social care, voluntary groups

  • Governor link to SENCo
  • Governor link to Heads of Year
  • SEND governor visits to school.

 

What Help and Support is available for the Family?

  1. Do you offer help with completing forms and paperwork?  If yes, who normally provides this help and how would parents access this?
  2. What information, advice and guidance can parents and young people access through the school?   Who normally provides this help and how would they access this?
  3. How does the school help parents with travel plans to get their son/daughter to and from school?

What Help and Support is available for the Family?

  1. Do you offer help with completing forms and paperwork?  If yes, who normally provides this help and how would parents access this?
  • We have close links with parent partnership who willsupport our parents in completing forms when necessary.
  • Inclusion Manager or SENCo will also support parents to complete CAFs, etc..
  • Connexions officer will assist with college transition application forms
  • A referral to Parent Partnerships may be made by the SENCO/Assistant SENCO if required

2. What information, advice and guidance can parents and young people access through the school?   Who normally provides this help and how would they access this?

 

  •  Information and guidance can be provided by school staff via email or telephone. The school telephone number is found on the school website, and calls will be directed by a receptionist at the earliest convenience to the relevant member of staff. School policy is to return all calls within 24 hours unless urgent.
  • If a school member of staff cannot provide correct guidance then external agencies will be consulted such as Social Services as per school protocol.
  • A Connexions Advisor will meet with pupils in school to provide advice on Further Education and will be available during the school week to all pupils
  • From Year 9 onwards, a Connexions Advisor will attend all annual reviews for SEND pupils and works closely with the SEN Faculty and Directors of Learning.
  • The school Web Site provides contact information
  • Citizenship Days are held in school to provide pupils advice such as career options, health or social concerns.
  • Careers advisor attends parents’ evenings and options/events

3. How does the school help parents with travel plans to get their son/daughter to and from school?

  • Pupils with more complex SEN/D will be identified by the home-school transport agreement in consultation with the local authority. This means that certain pupils who meet criteria may be eligible for school taxi transport.
  • Pupil use of bicycle to travel to school is encouraged and promoted. School provides bike sheds for pupils to secure bicycles.
  • Pupils are advised to travel safely to and from school

Transition from Primary School and School Leavers

  1. What support does the school offer for year 6 pupils coming to the school?  (e.g. visits to the school, buddying)
  2. What support is offered for young people leaving the school? (E.g. careers guidance, visits to colleges, apprenticeships, supported employment etc.)
  3. What advice/support do you offer young people and their parents about preparing for adulthood?

Transition from Primary School and School Leavers

  1. What support does the school offer for year 6 pupils coming to the school?  (e.g. visits to the school, buddying)

 

  • Learning mentor and Head of Year 7 visit, along with some Year 10 Peer Mentors and Year 7 pupils visit the feeder primary schools to speak to pupils in Year 6.
  • SENCO/Assistant SENCO visits with feeder primary school SENCO visits will be undertaken in the summer term
  • Year 6 pupils visit for two Induction Days in the Summer Term.
  • Additional pre transition visits for vulnerable/SEN pupils – (fortnightly half day)arranged by SENCo or Learning Mentor.
  • Year 5 pupils visit for a Science pupil/parent activity once a term after school.
  • Years 3 and 4 have various subject “taster” days.
  • Year 7 Learning Mentor does extra visits to primary school for pupils requiring extra support in transition to Secondary School.
  • Three Year 10 Peer Mentors attached to each Year 7 form.
  • Transition Manager speaks to Year 6 teachers to gather relevant information to help a smooth transition.
  • When the Year 7 forms are arranged the aim is for pupils to be with at least one of their friends.
  • During the Summer Term teachers from the Core subjects attend the feeder primary schools and give “taster lessons.”
  • Open Evening- Year 6 Induction Evening for parents and pupils
  • Any concerned parent/carers can contact the Transition Manager.
  • School staff attend feeder primary school to teach specialist subjects where the timetable permits
  • Designated Transition Manager in place

2. What support is offered for young people leaving the school? (e.g. careers guidance, visits to colleges, apprenticeships, supported employment etc)

 

  • Connexions support for Years 9, 10 and 11 for pupils with a Statement/EHCp or have had SEN support during KS4 (Attends review meetings) Connexions Officer with pupil and SENCo fills in LDA for all pupils in Year 11 with Statement/EHCp/SEN which is passed to College
  • Connexions Officer may arrange extra visits and taster days to college for pupils with SEND
  • One to one interviews with Connexions (usually twice)
  • College and course brochures are explored and discussed with pupils in one to one sessions with teachers and Learning Support Assistants
  • Taster days at local colleges in Year 10.
  • Mock interviews
  • College staff conduct pupil interviews
  • Connexions attend Year 9 and 11 Parents Evenings.
  • Visits to universities for AG&T.
  • Designated Transition manager in place

3. What advice/support do you offer young people and their parents about preparing for adulthood

Throughout school life the following attitudes are fostered:

  • Good attendance
  • Punctuality
  • Good behaviour
  • Respect

Provide good role models by the way staff treat each other and pupils.

  • Careers fairs
  • College visits
  • Advice sought from Connexions advisor

Extra Curricular Activities

  1. Do you offer school holiday and/or before and after school provision?  If yes, please give details.
  2. What lunchtime or after school activities do you offer?  Do parents have to pay for these and if so, how much?
  3. How do you make sure clubs, activities and residential trips are inclusive?
  4. How do you help children and young people to make friends?

Extra-Curricular Activities

  1. Do you offer school holiday and/or before and after school provision?  If yes, please give details.

 

  • Small groups of children take part in after school activities such as sporting clubs, and climbing club
  • The school boasts a modern gym where pupils are able to access daily after school until 4pm.
  • Pupils may enter the building and buy breakfast from the school canteen shortly before school starts at 8.15am.
  • Selected groups of pupils are able to attend summer school

2. What lunchtime or after school activities do you offer?  Do parents have to pay for these and if so, how much?

 

  • A variety of curricular clubs are offered during lunchtimes and after school throughout the various curriculum areas
  • There are a wide range of sports activities and teams on offer after school.
  • Activities may be enrichment activities, activities to celebrate pupil’s success or groups organised with external agencies.
  • The timetable for these can be found on the Web site.  Pupils are actively encouraged to attend these clubs.
  • At lunch and break times activities are provided for vulnerable pupils in the MLC.
  • Activities are open to both KS3 and KS4 pupils
  • All lunchtime and after school activities are free

3. How do you make sure clubs, activities and residential trips are inclusive?

 

  • All clubs, residential trips and activities are open to all pupils as long as attendance and behaviour meets the expected criteria
  • Risk assessments are carried out with parents.
  • LSAs are available to accompany any trip with SEND pupils.
  • Pre visits are made to ensure accessibility for all pupils

4. How do you help children and young people to make friends?

  • Circle time with Year 7 Learning Mentor.
  • Lunchtime club in the MLC
  • Year 10 peer mentors provide a valuable role in helping new Year 7 pupils settle into school life
  • Activities explored during Citizenship days to promote children’s’ social skills and peer relationships
  • Cross curricular lessons which encompass equal opportunities at all times and promote healthy relationships and personal well being
  • The role of the Form Tutor is vital in establishing any pastoral issues with a child
  • Early identification of any bullying issues that might affect friendships through staff and pupil mentors and prompt resolutions.
  • Peer mentors and peer mediators are available during unstructured times to support pupils
  • Emotional wellbeing and school counsellor available to support pupils experiencing emotional and social difficulties

Useful Contacts & Websites

Click here to view the list of useful contacts & websites

 Glossary

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD]

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a neurological condition, which manifests itself as an inability to focus on task. Most commonly this takes the form of unsettled or disruptive behaviour, fidgeting, leaving seat, tapping, talking, and making noises. This is the Hyperactivity aspect of the condition. It can also take the form of daydreaming, withdrawal, and distractibility. This is the Attention Deficit aspect of the condition. It is a variable spectrum and is sometimes treated using prescribed medication to stimulate the part of the brain that controls concentration. Referral can be through school and Educational Psychologist (E.P.) or from home and General Practitioner.

 

Attention Deficit Disorder [ADD]: Attention

Attention Deficit Disorder is similar to the other subtypes of ADHD in that it is characterized primarily by inattention, easy distractibility, disorganization, procrastination, and forgetfulness; where it differs is in lethargy – fatigue, and having fewer or no symptoms of hyperactivity or impulsiveness typical of the other ADHD subtypes

 

Annual Review

 

All statements and Education, Health and Care Plans must be reviewed annually. The Annual Review ensures that that once a year the parents, the pupil, the Local Authority, the school and all professionals involved consider the progress the pupil has made over the last 12 months, and whether amendments need to be made to the Statement or Education, Health and Care Plan.

 

Assessment

 

 

This involves building a picture of your child’s abilities, difficulties, behaviour, his/her special educational needs and the support required to meet those needs. Assessment is an important part of deciding whether your child’s progress rate is as good as is expected. Teachers carry out routine assessments regularly.

More specialised assessments may be required if progress is not at an expected rate. This may be carried out by the SENCO, an Educational Psychologist or an Advisory Teacher. 

A statutory assessment is a formal procedure which involves the collection of information from as many people as possible who have detailed knowledge about your child. This may lead to the issue of a statement of special educational needs.

ASD

Autistic Spectrum Disorder

 

Autistic spectrum disorders are characterised by difficulties interacting and communicating.  The characteristics of autism can be described as the 'triad of impairment':

  • Socialisation - poor social skills;
  • Communication - difficulties with speech language and communication;
  • Imagination - rigid thought and resistance to change.

The commonly used terms 'autism' and 'Asperger syndrome' are autistic spectrum disorders.

 

Asperger’s Syndrome

A form of Autism often without general learning difficulties and with increased verbal abilities. Asperger’s  manifests itself as a social communication difficulty where pupils may appear quiet and withdrawn. Pupils may also be socially isolated because of difficulties relating to peer group interaction. Pupils may also misinterpret what is said to them and this can lead to confusion and misunderstanding.

 

Code of Practice

 

The SEN Code of Practice (often referred to as ‘The Code’) gives practical guidance on how to identify, assess and support children with special educational needs. All early education settings, state schools and Local Education Authorities must take account of this Code when they are dealing with children who have special educational needs. 

 

Cognitive/cognition

Cognitive / Cognition refers to a level of understanding or comprehension. In some cases a pupil may appear to achieve at a very low level when, in fact their level of understanding is quite high but they have a specific difficulty in writing or recording that understanding. If questioned orally their performance is much higher.

 

Complex Learning Difficulties

Complex Learning Difficulties suggests that there is a combination of difficulties often behavioural which are affecting the pupil’s performance. It may suggest that the pupil’s learning needs are underlying the behaviour difficulties and if the learning needs can be successfully addressed, the behaviour problems will ease. Sometimes it can refer to a combination of Moderate Learning Difficulties and Specific Learning Difficulties.

 

Connexions

 

Connexions provide a targeted service to anyone aged between 13 and 25 who has a statement of SEN or an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) where it is deemed that special educational provision in it is still needed. They support in the transition from school to further education opportunities, work or training.

 

Differentiation

 

Differentiation is the adjustment of the teaching methods and/or resources according to the learning needs of the pupils. It can be aimed at the groups within the class or individuals. See also personalised learning.

 

Dyslexia

 

Children with dyslexia have a marked and persistent difficulty in learning to read, write and spell, despite making good progress in other areas. Areas of difficulty include:  working memory, organisation, reading comprehension, handwriting, punctuation, concentration, sequencing words and numbers. Students with dyslexia may also mispronounce common words or reverse letters and sounds in words. Dyslexia is a type of Specific Learning Difficulty (SpLD).

EHCP

Education, Health and Care Plan

 

From 1st September 2014, Education, Health and Care Plans (EHCPs) will be issued instead of statements of SEN. Existing statements will be converted to EHCPs over the next three years. An EHCP has the same statutory protection as a statement but it can be issued at and maintained to any point from birth to the age of 25. The criteria and procedure for securing an EHCP for your child is detailed as part of Salford’s Local Offer.

EP

 

Educational Psychologist

Most, but not all, Educational Psychologists are employed by local authorities (LAs). Their main work is with schools and pre-school settings to provide advice, support and staff training for children with SEN. They may perform assessments of children with SEN and produce a report as part of the statutory assessment.

 

Exam Special Arrangements

Special arrangements can be made for pupils who are disadvantaged during exams because of certain difficulties such as dyslexic tendencies. Readers, scribes and or extra time can be arranged, for pupils who meet the exam board criteria, in order that the disadvantage they have can be redressed.

 

Governors

 

Each school has a board of Governors that is responsible to parents, funders and the community for making sure the school provides a good quality education. In Academy schools the governors are often called ‘directors’.

 

Inclusion

 

Inclusion is the process by which schools and other establishments change their principles, policies, practices and environments to increase the presence, participation and achievement levels of children with special educational needs and/or a disability.

IEP

Individual Education Plan

 

An IEP sets out the special help that a child will receive at school or early years setting to meet his or her special educational needs (SEN). It is not a legal requirement for your child to have and IEP but it is good practice for parents and the child to be involved in drawing it up and reviewing it if there is one. An IEP should be reviewed regularly and at least twice a year. If there is no IEP the school should have another method of recording how it is meeting your child’s SEN

 

Learning Mentors

 

Learning Mentors work with school pupils and college students to help them address barriers to learning and improve achievement. The work they do depends on the priorities of the school they work in but can include running after-school clubs, anti-bullying programmes or helping young people to revise.

LEA

Local Education Authority

 

Each council has an LEA. The LEA is responsible for the education of all children living within the council’s area and has some responsibility for all state schools in our area.  In Salford, the LEA is combined with the children’s social services departments and is known as Children’s Services. Children’s Services have the same responsibilities for educational provision for children with special educational needs as LEAs.

MLC

Moorside Learning Centre

An area in school where small numbers of pupils with SEN can work together, with support, to achieve at least 5 A*-C grades (including maths and English) at GCSE level.

MLD

Moderate Learning Difficulties

Children with moderate learning difficulties have much greater difficulty than their peers in acquiring basic literacy and numeracy skills and in understanding concepts. They may also have associated speech and language delay, low self-esteem, low levels of concentration and under-developed social skills.

 

Multi-Sensory Impairment [MSI]

Pupils with Multi-Sensory Impairment (MSI) have much greater difficulties in accessing the curriculum and the environment than those with a single sensory impairment. They have difficulties in perception, communication and in the acquisition of information. Incidental learning is limited. The combination can result in high anxiety and multi-sensory deprivation. Pupils need teaching approaches which make good use of their residual hearing and vision, together with their other senses. They may need alternative means of communication.

 

National Curriculum

 

This sets out a clear, full and statutory entitlement to learning for all children, setting out what should be taught and setting attainment targets for learning. It also determines how performance will be assessed and reported. The national curriculum is taught in a way that meets the needs of individual children, e.g. setting goals that are achievable.

 

National Curriculum Inclusion Statement

A detailed statement within the national curriculum, setting out the principles that schools must follow, to make sure that all children have the chance to succeed.

 

Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy is activity designed to help the child attain maximum levels of functional performance thus gaining self-esteem and independence. Motor, sensory, perceptual, and

 emotional and self-care skills are assessed to improve a child’s ability to access the physical and learning curriculum.

 

Oppositional Defiance Disorder [ODD]

Common features of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) include excessive, often persistent anger, frequent temper tantrums or angry outbursts, as well as disregard for authority. Children and adolescents with ODD often purposely annoy others, blame others for their own mistakes, and are easily disturbed.

 

OFSTED

OFSTED stands for the Office for Standards in Education. OFSTED is the inspectorate for children and learners in England and they oversee the quality of the provision of education and care through inspection and regulation. They inspect childcare providers, schools, colleges, children’s services, teacher training and youth work.

 https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ofsted

PPO

Parent Partnership Officer

Provides impartial advice and information to parents whose children have special educational needs. The service offers neutral and factual support on all aspects of the SEN framework to help parents play an active and informed role in their child’s education.

 

Reading Age

Reading Age: There is sometimes a discrepancy between the chronological age of the pupil and the expected reading ability for that age. Some assessments provide an indication of purely mechanical skills i.e. simple decoding (Salford Test). Other assessments test reading comprehension.

 

Severe Learning Difficulty [SLD]

Pupils with Severe Learning Difficulties (SLD) have significant intellectual or cognitive impairments. This has a major effect on their ability to participate in the school curriculum without support. They may also have difficulties in mobility and co-ordination, communication and perception and the acquisition of self-help skills. Pupils with severe learning difficulties will need support in all areas of the curriculum. They may also require teaching of self-help, independence and social skills. Some pupils may use sign and symbols but most will be able to hold simple conversations.

SEMH

Social, Emotional and Mental Health

Social, emotional and mental health difficulties may become apparent in the following ways: age inappropriate behaviour or that which seems otherwise socially inappropriate; behaviour which interferes with the learning of the pupil or their peers (e.g. persistent calling out in class, refusal to work, persistent annoyance of peers); signs of emotional turbulence (e.g. unusual tearfulness, withdrawal from social situations); difficulties in forming and maintaining positive relationships (e.g. isolation from peers, aggressiveness to peers and adults).

 

Speech, Language and Communication Needs [SLCN]

Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) encompasses a wide range of difficulties related to all aspects of communication in children and young people. These can include difficulties with fluency, forming sounds and words, formulating sentences, understanding what others say, and using language socially.

SENCO

Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinator

A Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator or SENCO is a teacher who has the responsibility for overseeing the day-to-day SEN provision within his or her school. The SENCO and your child’s teacher/s should work together to plan how his/her needs should be met. Moorside High School has a SENCo and Assistant Senco

SEN

Special Educational Needs

The special aupport given to children with special educational needs which is additional to or different from the provision generally made for other children of the same age.

 

Special Educational Provision

The special help given to children with special educational needs which is additional to or different from the provision generally made for other children of the same age.

SEN

Special Educational Needs

Children with special educational needs have significantly greater difficulty in learning than most children of the same age or have a disability. These children may need extra or different help from that given to other children of the same age. Approximately one fifth of all children may have an SEN at some point in their school career.

 

Specific Learning Difficulty [SpLD]

The umbrella term specific learning difficulty (SpLD) is used to cover a wide variety of difficulties such as dyslexia; dysgraphia is a writing difficulty; dyspraxia is motor difficulties; dyscalculia is difficulty performing mathematical calculations; Attention deficit disorder, or attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADD or ADHD): concentration difficulties with heightened activity levels and impulsiveness; Asperger’s syndrome and autism: emotional behaviour or even social communication difficulties.

 

Statement of Special Educational Needs

The Statement of Special Educational Needs, or 'Statement' describes the special educational needs of a child and the help that she or he will get to meet those needs. It is a legal document that is produced at the end of a process known as ‘statutory assessment’. Only those children with the most severe, complex and persistent SEN will need a Statement. From September 1st 2104, no new statements will be written. Instead a new document – an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) with the same legal protection as a Statement will be produced.

 

Statutory Assessment

 

This is the legal process for producing an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP). Parents, a young person over the age of 16 who is deemed capable and a variety of professionals can request a statutory assessment. Parents and/or the young person themselves if they are deemed capable, must give their permission for this to go ahead. Not all Statutory Assessments result in the issuing of an Education, Health and Care Plan. From September 2014, Statutory Assessment can be carried out at any time between a child’s birth and the age of 25, although there will be very few young people undergoing the process for the first time beyond the age of 16.

TAs/ LSAs

Teaching Assistants

 

Almost all schools now employ teaching assistants to support whole classes, small groups or individual pupils. Teaching assistants may be called other things, such as learning support assistant (LSA) or special support assistant (SSA) particularly if they support a child with special needs.

 

Transition

 

Transition is when a child moves from one setting to another, such as from home to a child-minder, to nursery, to primary school, to secondary school, or from education into adult life. Planning for transition is important if your child has a significant level of need where advance preparations may need to be made in the new setting to ensure it is successful.

 

Transition Plan

 

If your child has a statement of SEN that has not yet been converted in to an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP), the annual review in year 9 (and any subsequent annual reviews until the young person leaves school) must include the drawing up and subsequent review of a Transition Plan. The Transition Plan should draw together information from a range of professionals within and beyond the school in order to plan for the young person's transition to adult life.

If your child ahs an EHCP, the Transition Plan is replaced by a ‘Preparing for adulthood’ review (see above).

 

Visual Impairment [VI]

Visual impairment is vision loss (of a person) to such a degree as to qualify as an additional support need through a significant limitation of visual capability.